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Ave Maria Radio's Online Only Membership Drive

Ave Maria Radio is conducting an online only membership drive this month aimed at raising much-needed funds and increasing its membership numbers. The goal is to get at least 250 new people to pledge their support and join a growing army of members who are making Ave Maria Radio a national powerhouse for the proclamation of the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church. By becoming a new member, you can be a part of this spirited movement of faith that broadcasts the salvation of Christ to people around the globe each and every day.

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September 24, 2013
In the Light of the Law  

Dr. Ed Peters’ blog

St. Dominic Chapel
From Providence College’s website:
“The Catholic and Dominican character of Providence College precisely as a college is most evident in its approach to faith and reason.”
About Drs. John Corvino and Dana Dillon, and about Providence College, I know next to nothing, and so can say next to nothing; about the ‘gay marriage’ debate—or at least about some Catholic principles applicable to the ‘gay marriage’ debate—I know something and so can say something.

Inviting a speaker to a college campus to address a volatile issue and offering (if belatedly) to provide a rebuttal speaker, but then cancelling the whole event apparently because management doesn’t like the views to be expressed by the original speaker, is the stuff of which higher education public relations disasters are made. But while Providence College works through its image problems (and, given the institutional identification with the Catholic Church, while the Church faces yet another PR mess not of her own making), it might help to step back and ask, what exactly was to be debated at the Providence ‘gay marriage’ debate in the first place?

Considering her age (+2,000 years), her membership (+1,000,000,000), and her range of concerns (eternal salvation and human civilization), the Catholic Church has a remarkably short list of non-negotiable assertions. Some of these non-negotiable assertions deal with dogma (e.g., Jesus is divine and human, or, there are exactly seven sacraments) and some of these non-negotiable assertions deal with doctrines (e.g., the Church has no power to ordain women to priesthood, or Thomas More is a saint) but in both cases, the assertion being made is, Catholics hold, being made with infallible certainty.

Now, among the assertions made by the Church with infallible certainty, I have argued, is this one: God made marriage to exist between one man and one woman. Catholics could debate, say, whether this assertion is a dogma to be believed or a doctrine to be held, or whether the assertion is knowable by reason alone or requires the gift of faith. Catholics could even debate whether civil unions of one sort or another between two persons of the same sex are good for society or bad. But Catholics cannot, I suggest, argue whether true marriage exists only between one man and one woman. To debate whether marriage can exist between two persons of the same sex is to imply that some Catholic non-negotiables can be negotiated by Catholics.


Dr. Ed Peters, canon lawyer

Read the rest here: http://canonlawblog.wordpress.com/2013/09/24/what-was-there-to-debate-at-providence/

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