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We were wrong, says former regulator of Dutch euthanasia

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Various safeguards were put in place to show who should qualify and doctors acting in accordance with these safeguards would not be prosecuted.  Because each case is unique, five regional review committees were installed to assess every case and to decide whether it complied with the law.

For five years after the law became effective, such physician-induced deaths remained level – and even fell in some years.  In 2007 I wrote that ‘there doesn’t need to be a slippery slope when it comes to euthanasia.  A good euthanasia law, in combination with the euthanasia review procedure, provides the warrants for a stable and relatively low number of euthanasia.’ Most of my colleagues drew the same conclusion.

But we were wrong – terribly wrong, in fact.  In hindsight, the stabilization in the numbers was just a temporary pause.  Beginning in 2008, the numbers of these deaths show an increase of 15% annually, year after year.  The annual report of the committees for 2012 recorded 4,188 cases in 2012 (compared with 1,882 in 2002).  2013 saw a continuation of this trend and I expect the 6,000 line to be crossed this year or the next.  Euthanasia is on the way to become a ‘default’ mode of dying for cancer patients.

Alongside this escalation other developments have taken place.  Under the name ‘End of Life Clinic,’ the Dutch Right to Die Society NVVE founded a network of travelling euthanizing doctors.  Whereas the law presupposes (but does not require) an established doctor-patient relationship, in which death might be the end of a period of treatment and interaction, doctors of the End of Life Clinic have only two options: administer life-ending drugs or sending the patient away.

Read more at CatholicEducation.org…

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