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The Suicide Gender Gap Narrows

A destitute girl throws herself from a bridge, her life ruined by alcoholism. Coloured etching by G. Cruikshank, 1848, after himself. This file comes from Wellcome Images, a website operated by Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation based in the United Kingdom.
A destitute girl throws herself from a bridge, her life ruined by alcoholism. Coloured etching by G. Cruikshank, 1848, after himself. This file comes from Wellcome Images, a website operated by Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation based in the United Kingdom.

While males have long demonstrated much higher suicide rates than females, longitudinal research released last week by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported a narrowing of that gap. Although the suicide rate across nearly all age groups has surged more than 24 percent from 1999 through 2014, the age-adjusted increase was much greater for females (a 45 percent increase) than for males (a 16 percent increase). Males still have suicide rates more than three times that of females (20.7 per 100,000 population versus 5.8 per 100,000 population), but it is clear that something significant is happening in the culture to move so many more women to commit the ultimate act of self-destruction.

Suicide has traditionally been viewed as a deviant act because it contributes to a climate in which individual life is devalued. For this reason, the norms surrounding suicide have been powerful. Most societies have recognized that suicide is not simply an act of violence against the self, but a violent force in the lives of others as well—so much so that even the most isolated or troubled individual was legally forbidden to commit this act. In England, suicide was once regarded as so damaging to society that the penalty for attempting it was a cruel death.

Read more at CatholicWorldReport.com…

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