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The Origins of Ash Wednesday and the Use of Ashes

Ash-Wednesday

What are origins of Ash Wednesday and the use of ashes?

The liturgical use of ashes originated in Old Testament times. Ashes symbolized mourning, mortality and penance. For instance, in the Book of Esther, Mordecai put on sackcloth and ashes when he heard of the decree of King Ahasuerus (or Xerxes, 485-464 BC) of Persia to kill all of the Jewish people in the Persian Empire (Est 4:1). Job (whose story was written between 7th and 5th centuries BC) repented in sackcloth and ashes (lob 42:6). Prophesying the Babylonian captivity of Jerusalem, Daniel (c. 550 BC) wrote, “I turned to the Lord God, pleading in earnest prayer, with fasting, sackcloth and ashes” (Daniel 9:3). In the 5th century BC, after Jonha’s preaching of conversion and repentance, the town of Ninevah proclaimed a fast and put on sackcloth, and the king covered himself with sackcloth and ashes (Jonah 3:5-6). These Old Testament examples evidence both a recognized practice of using ashes and a common understanding of their symbolism.

Jesus Himself also made reference to ashes; Referring to towns that refused to repent of sin although they had witnessed the miracles and heard the good news, our Lord said, “If the miracles worked in you had taken place in Tyre and Sidon, they would have reformed sackcloth and ashes long ago” (Mt 11:21).

The early Church continued the usage of ashes for the same symbolic reasons. In his book, Tertullian (c. 160-220) prescribed that the penitent must ”live without joy in the roughness of sackcloth and the squalor of ashes. ” Eusebius (260-340), the famous early Church historian, recounted in his “History of the Church” how an apostate named Natalis came to Pope Zephyrinus clothed in sackcloth and ashes begging forgiveness. Also during this tune, for those who were required to do public penance, the priest sprinkled ashes on the head of the person leaving confession.

Read more at CatholicHerald.com…

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