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Ave Maria Radio's Online Only Membership Drive

Ave Maria Radio is conducting an online only membership drive this month aimed at raising much-needed funds and increasing its membership numbers. The goal is to get at least 250 new people to pledge their support and join a growing army of members who are making Ave Maria Radio a national powerhouse for the proclamation of the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church. By becoming a new member, you can be a part of this spirited movement of faith that broadcasts the salvation of Christ to people around the globe each and every day.

If everyone visiting this website made a tax-deductible donation right now – and there are hundreds of thousands of you – Ave Maria Radio would certainly meet its financial goals for the year in just 29 days! Think about it – the more you’re able to give, the nearer Ave Maria Radio gets to achieving its goals.

So do it now. Let’s put more people on the pathway to heaven. Become a new member today! Just click the donate button and make a difference! Stay tuned to this page to see our progress as the Ave Maria Radio online-only membership drive continues.

Please use the form below to contribute to Ave Maria Radio’s February Online Membership Drive.

NOTE: The form on this page is located on a secure site. If you wish to make a monthly recurring donation below, please insert only the monthly payment amount and not the total annual pledge amount into the Donation Amount field below. Also, please indicate if your pledge is for one year only in the Additional Information field. Your donations to Ave Maria Radio are fully tax deductible. You will receive an annual statement in January of each year for your donations.

If you have any problems with or questions about this form, or if you need to make a change to your existing recurring credit card donation, please contact Tony Gerring, Director of Advancement Services, at 734-930-4528 or email him at: [email protected].

 

By GREG MOORE, Associated Press | August 10, 2013 | Updated: August 11, 2013 5:28pm

Photo By Las Ultimas Noticias

Hannah Gastonguay, holding her baby Rahab, is followed by her husband Sean and the
couple’s 3-year-old daughter Ardith, as they disembark in the port city of
San Antonio, Chile, Friday, Aug. 9, 2013.
PHOENIX (AP) The Houston Chronicle — A northern Arizona family has survived being lost at sea for weeks after an ill-fated attempt to leave the U.S. over what they consider government interference in religion.
 
Hannah Gastonguay and her family will fly back home Sunday after taking their two small children and her father-in-law and setting sail from San Diego for the tiny island nation of Kiribati in May.
 
Weeks into their journey, the Gastonguays hit a series of storms that damaged their small boat, leaving them adrift for weeks, unable to make progress. They were eventually picked up by a Venezuelan fishing vessel, transferred to a Japanese cargo ship and taken to Chile.
 
Their flights home were arranged by U.S. Embassy officials, Gastonguay said. The U.S. State Department declined to comment on Sunday.
 
The months-long journey has been “pretty exciting” and “little scary at certain points,” Gastonguay told The Associated Press by telephone.
 
The 26-year-old mother said they wanted to go to Kiribati because “we didn’t want to go anywhere big.” She said they understood the island to be “one of the least developed countries in the world.”
Kiribati is a group of islands just off the equator and the international date line about halfway between Hawaii and Australia. The total population is just over 100,000 people of primarily Micronesian descent.
 
Hannah Gastonguay said her family was fed up with government control in the U.S. As Christians they don’t believe in “abortion, homosexuality, in the state-controlled church,” she said.
 
U.S. “churches aren’t their own,” Gastonguay said, suggesting that government regulation interfered with religious independence.
 
Among other differences, she said they had a problem with being “forced to pay these taxes that pay for abortions we don’t agree with.” While federal law bars public funding for abortion, state attempts to block Medicaid funding for organizations that provide the procedure have met with legal hurdles. Opponents say that funding allows those groups to perform abortions.
 
The Gastonguays weren’t members of any church, and Hannah Gastonguay said their faith came from reading the Bible and through prayer.
 
“The Bible is pretty clear,” she said.
 
The family moved in November from Ash Fork, Ariz., to San Diego, where they lived on their boat as they prepared to set sail. She said she gave birth to the couple’s 8-month-old girl on the boat, which was docked in a slip at the time.
 
In May, Hannah, her 30-year-old husband Sean, his father Mike, and the couple’s daughters, 3-year-old Ardith and baby Rahab set off. They wouldn’t touch land again for 91 days, she said.
She said at first, “We were cruising.”
 
But within a couple of weeks “when we came out there, storm, storm, storm.”
 
The boat had taken a beating, and they decided to set course for the Marquesas Islands. Instead, they found themselves in a “twilight zone,” taking more and more damage, leaving them unable to make progress.
 

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