Program Details:

Call-in Phone: n/a

believe it. Her concise, one minute summaries are written in easy to understand language all can absorb and remember and are reviewed by Canon lawyer, Msgr. Douglas Mathers, for accuracy. Topics covered include everything from Adam to atheism.

(Visited 92 times, 1 visits today)

Peggy Stanton's Latest Posts

  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Way of Prayer

    • Program #: 241
    • Description: What do we mean by the Way of Prayer? The Catholic Catechism tells us that in the living tradition of prayer, each Church proposes to the members a language for prayer within the context of of its historical, cultural and social background. The Magisterium of the Church has the task of discerning if these ways of praying are faithful to the traditions of the Apostolic faith. There is, the Catechism insists, no other way of Christian prayer than Christ. Why? Because, whether our prayer is communal or vocal, it only has access to the Father through the name of Jesus which means “God Saves.” It is through his sacred humanity that the Holy Spirit teaches us to pray to our Father. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Hail Mary

    • Program #: 240
    • Description: What is the meaning of the Hail Mary? There are multiple meanings, explains the Catholic Catechism. When we say,“Hail Mary” or “Rejoice, Mary”, we are repeating the greeting of the angel Gabriel to Mary at the Annunciation. The next phrase, “Full of grace, the Lord is with you” asserts that Mary is full of grace because the SOURCE of grace - the Lord - is with her. “Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb,” echoes Elizabeth when she greeted her young cousin who has come to assist her during her delivery of John the Baptist. “Holy Mary, Mother of God” means that because Mary gives us Jesus,her Son, the God-Man, Mary is the Mother of God and our Mother. The final plea to Mary, “pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death,” acknowledges that we are sinners, now, hoping that Mary can welcome us as our Mother at the hour we die, and lead us to her Son, Jesus, in Paradise. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta's Minute With the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Temptations Against Prayer

    • Program #: 239
    • Description: What are some of the common temptations against prayer? The Catechism claims that the most common yet hidden temptation is lack of faith which is expressed, not so much in a declaration of disbelief, as our actual preferences. For instance, when we begin to pray, a thousand labors or cares vie for priority. This is a moment of truth for our heart. What is our heart’s true love? Do we call on the Lord just as a last resort? Or do we presumptuously call on him as an ally? In each case, the Catechism says, we have not acquired the disposition of the humble heart which remembers the Lord’s words, “Apart from me, you can do nothing.” A presumptuous heart may experience the temptation of acedia; defined as spiritual depression due to lax ascetical practice, decreasing vigilance and carelessness of heart. As Jesus chastised his sleeping apostles in Gethsemane, “The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.” This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta's Minute With the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Servants of Prayer

    • Program #: 238
    • Description: Where are servants of prayer? The Christian family is the first place of education in prayer, says the Catholic Catechism. The family is the domestic Church where children learn to pray and to persevere in prayer. Ordained ministers are also responsible for forming their brothers and sisters in prayer. Many in the religious life have consecrated their whole lives to prayer. The consecrated life is sustained by prayer and is one of the living sources of contemplation and spiritual life of the Church. Catechesis aims to teach all members of the Church to meditate on the Word of God in personal and liturgical prayer, internalizing it in order to bear fruit in a new life. Prayer groups and spiritual direction can also be powerful tools in the practice of prayer. A spiritual director should be chosen with great care for as St. John of the Cross warns, “As the master is, so will the disciple be.” This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Power in the Name of Jesus

    • Program #: 180
    • Description: Why is the calling on the Name of Jesus so powerful? According to the Catholic Catechism, “to pray Jesus is to invoke Him and to call Him within us. We are welcoming the Son of God who loved us and gave Himself up for us. A simple invocation developed through tradition in both East and West and transmitted by the spiritual writers of the Sinai, Syria and Mount Athos is: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on us sinners.” Through this prayer, the human heart is opened to human wretchedness and the Savior’s mercy.” Invoking the holy name of Jesus is the simplest way of praying always. If the heart is humbly attentive, the prayer is not lost by heaping up empty phrases. It holds fast to the Word and brings forth fruit with patience. The prayer of the Church also honors the heart of Jesus and the Way of the Cross which we call “making the Stations.” This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Meditative Prayer

    • Program #: 177
    • Description: What is meditative prayer? The Catholic Catechism defines meditative prayer as, above all, a quest. The mind seeks to understand the why and how of the Christian life, in order to adhere and respond to what the Lord is asking. Since the required attentiveness is difficult to sustain, we are aided by books, such as sacred scripture, especially the gospels, holy icons, liturgical texts of the day or season and writings of the spiritual fathers. If we meditate on what we read, we make it our own. If we are humble and faithful in meditation, we discover in meditation, the movements that stir the heart, enabling us to discern those movements. We are asking, “Lord, what do you want me to do?” There are as many methods of meditation as there are spiritual masters. The Catechism urges us to develop the desire to meditate regularly. All meditation should advance us to the knowledge of the love of the Lord Jesus. This is Peggy Stanton and this this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Life of Prayer

    • Program #: 168
    • Description: What is the life of our heart? The Catholic Catechism answers, “Prayer is the life of the new heart.” It ought to be the source of our animation at every moment. But we tend to forget the One who is our all. The Fathers of the spiritual life in the Deuteromic and prophetic tradition, say that “prayer is a remembrance of God often awakened by the memory of the heart.” We are to remember God more often,,”says the Catechism, “than we draw breath.”We cannot, however, pray at all times if we have not learned to pray at specific times. The tradition of the Church proposes morning and evening prayer, grace before and after meals, the Liturgy of the hours, Sundays centered on the Eucharist, the cycle of the liturgical year with its great feasts as the basic rhythms of the Christian’s life of prayer. There are three major expressions of prayer; vocal, meditative and contemplative. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Holy Spirit and Prayer

    • Program #: 161
    • Description: Whom do we most need in order to say, “Jesus is Lord? The Holy Spirit. The Catechism says that every time we invoke Jesus, it is the Holy Spirit who draws us onto the path of prayer. And since it is the Holy Spirit who teaches us to pray by recalling Jesus, how can we not pray to the Holy Spirit, too? The Church urges us to call on the Holy Spirit continually, especially at the beginning and the close of every important action. And how should we pray to Him? The traditional form is to invoke the Father through Christ our Lord to give us the Consoler, the Spirit. The simplest most direct invocation is: “Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of the faithful, enkindle in them the fire of your love.” The Holy Spirit is the artisan of the living tradition of prayer and the Master of interior prayer. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: Expressions of Prayer

    • Program #: 157
    • Description: How best to express ourselves to God? Our prayer takes flesh says the Catholic Catechism, when we use mental or vocal words to talk to God who speaks to us through his Word. Our heart must be involved in prayer. We must be present to Him whom we are addressing. Whether or not our prayer is heard depends not on the “number of our words”, says St. John Chrysotom, “as the fervor of our souls.” Vocal prayer is essential to the Christian life. Jesus taught the perfect vocal prayer - the Our Father - to his disciples. He prayed aloud the liturgical prayers in the synagogue. He also prayed aloud personally, exultantly praising the Father as well as expressing his agony in Gethsemane. Vocal prayer fits the needs of our human nature. We are body and spirit and this need corresponds to a divine requirement. God seeks worshipers in truth and spirit. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.
  • Malta Minute with the Catechism: A Cloud of Witnessess

    • Program #: 149
    • Description: Like the saints, do our loved one who have gone before us still participate in the living tradition of prayer? The Catholic Catechism says they participate by the witness of their lives, the transmission of their writings, and their actual prayer right now. Witnesses in heaven contemplate God, praise him and constantly care for those they have left on earth. When saints enter into the joy of their master, they are put in charge of many things. The Catechism asserts the Saint's intercession is their most exalted service to God's plan. Thus, we should be asking them to intercede for us and for the entire world. Sometimes personal charisms and witnesses to God's love for mankind are past on as the spirit of Elijah who was past on to Elisha and John the Baptist in order that their followers may have a share in their spirit. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta's Minute With the Catechism.