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Ave Maria Radio's Online Only Membership Drive

Ave Maria Radio is conducting an online only membership drive this month aimed at raising much-needed funds and increasing its membership numbers. The goal is to get at least 250 new people to pledge their support and join a growing army of members who are making Ave Maria Radio a national powerhouse for the proclamation of the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church. By becoming a new member, you can be a part of this spirited movement of faith that broadcasts the salvation of Christ to people around the globe each and every day.

If everyone visiting this website made a tax-deductible donation right now – and there are hundreds of thousands of you – Ave Maria Radio would certainly meet its financial goals for the year in just 29 days! Think about it – the more you’re able to give, the nearer Ave Maria Radio gets to achieving its goals.

So do it now. Let’s put more people on the pathway to heaven. Become a new member today! Just click the donate button and make a difference! Stay tuned to this page to see our progress as the Ave Maria Radio online-only membership drive continues.

Please use the form below to contribute to Ave Maria Radio’s February Online Membership Drive.

NOTE: The form on this page is located on a secure site. If you wish to make a monthly recurring donation below, please insert only the monthly payment amount and not the total annual pledge amount into the Donation Amount field below. Also, please indicate if your pledge is for one year only in the Additional Information field. Your donations to Ave Maria Radio are fully tax deductible. You will receive an annual statement in January of each year for your donations.

If you have any problems with or questions about this form, or if you need to make a change to your existing recurring credit card donation, please contact Tony Gerring, Director of Advancement Services, at 734-930-4528 or email him at: [email protected].

 

Trip to Israel Would Come After Pontiff’s Strong Condemnations of Anti-Semitism

Wall Street Journal

Updated Oct. 17, 2013 7:25 p.m. ET

Six days after the death of former Nazi commander Erich Priebke, the furor over his burial continues, with Italian and Vatican officials refusing a funeral. Priebke had been serving a life sentence in Italy when he died at age 100. (Photo: Getty)
ROME— Pope Francis plans to visit Israel as soon as next year, the Vatican said, in what could be a landmark visit for a pontiff who has already won plaudits from the Jewish community for his strong condemnation of anti-Semitism.

On Thursday, the pope also met at the Vatican with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, who invited him to visit Palestine as well. Israeli President Shimon Peres had already extended an invitation to the pope to visit the Holy Land shortly after the pontiff’s election in March.
Following the invitation from Mr. Abbas, “we can now start thinking in a more concrete way regarding the planning of the visit,” said Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi, adding that it could take place in 2014.

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Pope Francis met Palestinian President Mahmud Abbas also known as Abu Mazen, during a private audience at the Vatican on Thursday. Poll Press
A papal trip to Israel and the Palestinian territories would follow in the footsteps of Pope Francis’s predecessors, Benedict XVI and John Paul II. Both sought to promote Christian reconciliation with Judaism as emphasized in the key 1962-65 Second Vatican Council and do away with any vestiges of anti-Semitism after centuries of ambiguity within the church.


A visit by Pope Francis, who has so far made only one overseas trip since his appointment, could advance that dialogue. “We can see the steady and ongoing commitment of the Catholic Church on improving Catholic-Jewish relations,” said Chad Pecknold, assistant professor of theology at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC.
During his young papacy, Pope Francis has reached out to the Jewish community on several fronts. Last week, he met with members of Rome’s Jewish community to mark the 70th anniversary of the start of deportations of Italian Jews from Rome to Nazi concentration camps during the German occupation of Italy. On Oct. 16, 1943, more than 1,000 Roman Jews were deported. Only 16 returned home.
“For many centuries…the Jewish community and the Church of Rome have lived in our city, with a history—as we well know—that was often traversed by misunderstandings and even true grievances,” Pope Francis said at the meeting.


Read the rest here:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303680404579141563422438386

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