Kresta in the Afternoon – May 19, 2009 – Hour 1

  • Description:

    First Topic – Kresta Comments

    Second Topic – Science vs. Religion: A New Battlefield Over the Missing Link?

    In what could prove to be a landmark discovery, a leading paleontologist said scientists have dug up the 47 million-year-old fossil of an ancient primate whose features suggest it could be the common ancestor of all later monkeys, apes and humans. According to Darwinian evolution, humans evolved from ancient ape-like ancestors. Some 50 million years ago, two ape-like groups walked the Earth. One is known as the tarsidae, a precursor of the tarsier, a tiny, large-eyed creature that lives in Asia. Another group is known as the adapidae, a precursor of today's lemurs in Madagascar. Based on previously limited fossil evidence, one big debate had been whether the tarsidae or adapidae group gave rise to monkeys, apes and humans. This latest discovery bolsters the less common position that our ancient ape-like ancestor was an adapid, the believed precursor of lemurs. Dr. Fuzz Rana of Reasons to Believe is here to shed some light on the story.

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