Kresta in the Afternoon – October 19, 2017 – Hour 1

+  Kresta Comments: The Free-Market Debate

+  By What Standard Should Catholics Hold Capitalism? (2 segments)

  • Description: Communism and Socialism may sound nice on paper, but they've never worked in real life and have resulted in millions of deaths. Capitalism also works in theory, but in real life it has had its own failures. So what measure should we use to evaluate it? We'll talk with Sam Gregg.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Dr. Sam Gregg
      Samuel Gregg is research director at the Acton Institute. He writes and speaks regularly on morality and economics. He is the author of many books including, For God and Profit: How Banking and Finance can Serve the Common Good. He is published in journals such as the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, Ethics and Public Policy and the Public Discourse. Visit acton.org.
    • Resources:
  • + Articles Mentioned:

  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Economic Thinking for the Theologically Minded

      Economic Thinking for the Theologically Minded provides an introduction to what has been called 'the economic way of thinking,' which explains some of the critical concepts and foundational assumptions employed in economics. (learn more)

    • Tea Party Catholic: The Catholic Case for Limited Government, a Free Economy, and Human Flourishing

      Over the past fifty years, increasing numbers of American Catholics have abandoned the economic positions associated with Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal and chosen to embrace the principles of economic freedom and limited government: ideals upheld by Ronald Reagan and the Tea Party movement but also deeply rooted in the American Founding. This shift, alongside America’s growing polarization around economic questions, has generated fierce debates among Catholic Americans in recent years. Can a believing Catholic support free markets? Does the Catholic social justice commitment translate directly into big government? Do limited government Catholic Americans have something unique to contribute to the Church’s thinking about the economic challenges confronting all Catholics around the globe? In Tea Party Catholic, Samuel Gregg draws upon Catholic teaching, natural law theory, and the thought of the only Catholic Signer of America’s Declaration of Independence, Charles Carroll of Carrollton—the first “Tea Party Catholic”—to develop a Catholic case for the values and institutions associated with the free economy, limited government, and America’s experiment in ordered liberty. Beginning with the nature of freedom and human flourishing, Gregg underscores the moral and economic benefits of business and markets as well as the welfare state’s problems. Gregg then addresses several related issues that divide Catholics in America. These include the demands of social justice, the role of unions, immigration, poverty, and the relationship between secularism and big government. Above all, Gregg underlines how economic freedom’s corrosion in America is undermining the United States’ robust commitment to religious liberty—a principle integral not only to the American Founding and the life of Charles Carroll but also the teaching of the Second Vatican Council. As a creative minority, Gregg argues, limited government Catholics can help transform the wider movement to reground the United States upon the best insights of the American Experiment—and thereby save that Experiment itself. (learn more)

    • For God and Profit: How Banking and Finance Can Serve the Common Good

      From Christianity’s very beginning, it has had a difficult relationship with the world of money. Through developing sophisticated understandings of the nature and wealth-creating capacity of capital, Christian theologians, philosophers, and financiers exerted considerable influence upon the emergence and development of the international financial systems that helped unleash a revolution in the way the world thinks about and uses capital. In For God and Profit, Samuel Gregg underscores the different ways in which Christians have helped to develop the financial and banking systems that have helped millions escape poverty for hundreds of years. But he also provides a critical lens through which to assess the workings—and failures—of modern finance and banking. Far from being doomed to producing economic instability and periodic financial crises, Gregg illustrates that how Christian faith and reason can shape financial practices and banking institutions in ways that restore integrity to our troubled financial systems.
      (learn more)

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