Kresta in the Afternoon – November 1, 2019 – Hour 2

+  The Lives of the Assisi Saints (full hour)

  • Description: When Francis of Assisi died at the age of 44 in 1226, he left behind nothing that the world would consider as material wealth. But if one counts as riches the fruits of the spirit and of a humble and a contrite heart, he was wealthy beyond measure, and left behind a legacy that survives, thrives, and changes lives even today. On this All Saints Day we look at the lives of Francis and Clare
  • Segment Guests:
    • Bill Cook
      William Cook is Professor Emeritus of History at State University of New York - Genesceo, where he taught on Medieval and Renaissance Europe and Church History. He is the president of the Bill Cook Foundation, which helps poor children in 29 countries go to school. Visit billcookfoundation.org. His books include Images of St. Francis of Assisi and Francis of Assisi: The Way of Poverty and Humility and he has hosted several Great Courses lecture series, covering topics such as Saints, the Cathedral and early Church fathers.
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Francis of Assisi: The Way of Poverty and Humility

      My task . . . is to rely as much as possible on both written and visual sources, although I obviously must consider the discoveries and insights of modern scholarship, in order to present Francis of Assisi as a major figure in the mystical tradition. This means I will not be much concerned with Francis as the founder of a religious order. I will not present a detailed biography, although the first chapter provides a general overview in order to make the more detailed discussions of his spirituality more intelligible. Rather than attempt to discuss all texts by and about Francis of a mystical nature, I shall instead focus on six elements of his life and spirituality-his conversion; his relationship to the created world; the creation of the Christmas crib at Greccio; the role of learning; the relationship between the active and contemplative life; and his stigmatization at LaVerna in 1224, two years before his death. I believe that a detailed discussion and analysis of these aspects of Francis's life will best introduce the reader to Francis of Assisi -from the Introduction (learn more)

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