Kresta in the Afternoon – May 23, 2019 – Hour 2

+  The Christian Foundations of Religious Liberty (full hour)

  • Description: The idea of religious liberty is founded on a simple, essential truth: that religious faith is an inward disposition of the mind and heart and therefore cannot be coerced by an external force. Contrary to popular belief, this idea can be traced back far beyond the enlightenment to the earliest centuries of the Church. We look at the Christian foundations of religious liberty with Robert Wilken.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Dr. Robert Wilken
      Dr Robert Wilken is the author of Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian Origins of Religious Liberty. He's Emeritus Professor of Christianity at the University of Virginia and Chairman of the Board for the Institute for Religion and Public Life, the publisher of First Things magazine.
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian Origins of Religious Freedom

      From one of the leading historians of Christianity comes this sweeping reassessment of religious freedom, from the church fathers to John Locke In the ancient world Christian apologists wrote in defense of their right to practice their faith in the cities of the Roman Empire. They argued that religious faith is an inward disposition of the mind and heart and cannot be coerced by external force, laying a foundation on which later generations would build. Chronicling the history of the struggle for religious freedom from the early Christian movement through the seventeenth century, Robert Louis Wilken shows that the origins of religious freedom and liberty of conscience are religious, not political, in origin. They took form before the Enlightenment through the labors of men and women of faith who believed there could be no justice in society without liberty in the things of God. This provocative book, drawing on writings from the early Church as well as the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, reminds us of how “the meditations of the past were fitted to affairs of a later day.” (learn more)

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