Kresta in the Afternoon – July 11, 2019 – Hour 2

+  Do Smartphones Make Us Smarter?

  • Description: Smartphones give us round-the-clock access to the internet, providing us with a constant stream of sounds, images, videos and information that no other generation has experienced. Are we better off because of it? How does it impact our relationship and imagination? We’ll talk with Elijah John.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Elijah John
      Elijah John is a priest in Oregon who writes under this pen name as a connection to the prophets. He’s the author of Imagination Gone Wild
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Imagination Gone Wild

      Are you addicted to your television, computer or phone? One of the biggest temptations in the modern world is to be attached to a smartphone, the internet or other tech devices. We have all heard what what the smartphone and the internet are doing to people's lives - from the news reports of teens staying up all night on their phones, to men and women of all ages addicted to pornography, to people who are burning out on social media. The problem we face has never been seen throughout the history of man. The fruits from a constant diet of images are beginning to be made manifest. People are beginning to struggle because their smartphone is their only companion. Many have left reality for the imaginative world and do not know how to get out of it. Others are so led by the imagination that their emotions and reason are slowly dying. This book will help you to break free from the screens and find God and reality. You will begin to understand how our culture of images began, how our imagination quickly became overloaded and affected our relationships, psychology and spirit. Imagination for many has been drowned in pornography, the new drug and health hazard. Do not fear. With the help of God and facing reality, you can begin to mortify your imagination and face the present moment. This book is a simple read and the truths you will begin to understand will help you to no longer remain enslaved to the screens. (learn more)

+  Christian Fidelity in a Fractured World (2 segments)

  • Description: Common life in our society is in decline. How did this happen? Can it be fixed? Jake Meador joins us looking at how our common citizenship in a heavenly city, rather than economic or political alliances, tells a story that can help us truly work together for the common good.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Jake Meador
      Jake Meador is the author of In Search of the Common Good: Christian Fidelity in a Fractured World. He's vice president of the Davenant Institute and the editor in chief of Mere Orthodoxy, an online magazine covering the Christian faith in the public sphere. He lives with his wife and children in his hometown of Lincoln, Nebraska. Visit mereorthodoxy.com.
    • Resources:
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • In Search of the Common Good: Christian Fidelity in a Fractured World

      Common life in our society is in decline. Our communities are disintegrating, as the loss of meaningful work and the breakdown of the family leave us anxious and alone―indeed, half of all Americans report daily feelings of loneliness. Our public discourse is polarized and hateful. Ethnic minorities face systemic injustices and the ever-present fear of violence and deportation. Economic inequalities are widening. In this book, Jake Meador diagnoses our society's decline as the failure of a particular story we've told about ourselves: the story of modern liberalism. He shows us how that story has led to our collective loss of meaning, wonder, and good work, and then recovers each of these by grounding them in a different story―a story rooted in the deep tradition of the Christian faith. Our story doesn't have to end in loneliness and despair. There are reasons for hope―reasons grounded in a different, better story. In Search of the Common Good reclaims a vision of common life for our fractured times: a vision that doesn't depend on the destinies of our economies or our political institutions, but on our citizenship in a heavenly city. Only through that vision―and that citizenship―can we truly work together for the common good. (learn more)

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