Kresta in the Afternoon – January 23, 2019 – Hour 2

+  Jesus, Islam and the Quran

  • Description: Jesus of Nazareth holds a very special place for all Muslims. He is mentioned over thirty times in the Qur’an and is called Messiah, Spirit of God, and a prophet of God who performed miracles and raised the dead with God’s permission. It is also believed that Jesus will come at the end times to judge humanity and usher in a Muslim-era. What did Mohammed know, understand and believe about Jesus and how did it influence his own writings? We’ll talk with Brian Bradford.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Brian Bradford
      Dr. Brian Bradford attended Lumen Christi High School before earning the B.A. in history and philosophy at Spring Arbor University. After studying archeology in Israel, he earned the M. A. in history from Central Michigan University and subsequently completed his doctoral studies at Western Michigan University under our friend Paul Maier. He has extensive teaching experience in ancient and medieval history and has lectured on comparative religion, the early history of Monasticism, and Christian references in Islamic tradition.
  • + Articles Mentioned:

+  How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity (2 segments)

  • Description: The false notion that man is the measure of all things has permeated the culture and even influenced Christian thought. It reduces the faith to an inordinate concern for “social justice,” radical political change, and an increasingly fanatical egalitarianism, stripping it of its transcendental reference points. Humanitarians, secular or religious, confuse peace with pacifism, equitable social arrangements with socialism, and moral judgment with utopianism and sentimentality. Daniel Mahoney joins with with a counter to this type of thought.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Daniel Mahoney
      Daniel Mahoney is the author of The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity. He holds the Augustine Chair in Distinguished Scholarship at Assumption College and is a specialist in French political philosophy, anti-totalitarian thought, and the intersection of religion and politics. He is the author of several other books including The Conservative Foundations of the Liberal Order.
  • + Articles Mentioned:

  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity

      This book is a learned essay at the intersection of politics, philosophy, and religion. It is first and foremost a diagnosis and critique of the secular religion of our time, humanitarianism, or the “religion of humanity.” It argues that the humanitarian impulse to regard modern man as the measure of all things has begun to corrupt Christianity itself, reducing it to an inordinate concern for “social justice,” radical political change, and an increasingly fanatical egalitarianism. Christianity thus loses its transcendental reference points at the same time that it undermines balanced political judgment. Humanitarians, secular or religious, confuse peace with pacifism, equitable social arrangements with socialism, and moral judgment with utopianism and sentimentality. With a foreword by the distinguished political philosopher Pierre Manent, Mahoney’s book follows Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI in affirming that Christianity is in no way reducible to a “humanitarian moral message.” In a pungent if respectful analysis, it demonstrates that Pope Francis has increasingly confused the Gospel with left-wing humanitarianism and egalitarianism that owes little to classical or Christian wisdom. It takes its bearings from a series of thinkers (Orestes Brownson, Aurel Kolnai, Vladimir Soloviev, and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn) who have been instructive critics of the “religion of humanity.” These thinkers were men of peace who rejected ideological pacifism and never confused Christianity with unthinking sentimentality. The book ends by affirming the power of reason, informed by revealed faith, to provide a humanizing alternative to utopian illusions and nihilistic despair. (learn more)

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