Kresta in the Afternoon – December 21, 2017 – Hour 2

+  #21: The Scopes Monkey Trial and America's Debate on Science and Religion

  • Description: On July 10, 1925, a dramatic trial began in the sleepy town of Dayton, Tennessee. Known as the Scopes Monkey Trial, it pit William Jennings Bryan and anti-Darwinists against a science teacher named John Scopes in a debate over science, religion and their place in public education - a debate that continues to this day. We'll look back and the trial and the current state of the debate with Ed Larson.
  • Segment Guests:
    • Dr. Ed Larson
      Ed Larson holds the Hugh and Hazel Darliing Chair in Law at Pepperdine University, where he is a Professor of History. He has lectured on all seven continents and taught at Stanford Law School, the University of Melbourne and the University of Georgia. He's the author of many books, including "Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate over Science and Religion," for which he received the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1998.
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion

      In the summer of 1925, the sleepy hamlet of Dayton, Tennessee, became the setting for one of the 20th century's most contentious dramas: the Scopes trial that pit William Jennings Bryan and the anti-Darwinists against a teacher named John Scopes into a famous debate over science, religion, and their place in public education That trial marked the start of a battle that continues to this day-in Dover, Pennsylvania, Kansas, Cobb County, Georgia, and many other cities and states throughout the country. Edward Larson's classic, Summer for the Gods, received the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1998 and is the single most authoritative account of a pivotal event whose combatants remain at odds in school districts and courtrooms. For this edition, Larson has added a new preface that assesses the state of the battle between creationism and evolution, and points the way to how it might potentially be resolved. (learn more)

+  #20: Gosnell: The Untold Story of a Killer (2 segments)

  • Description: In 2013 Dr Kermit Gosnell was convicted of killing four people, including three babies. He's thought to have killed hundreds, if not thousands, more in his 30 years in the abortion industry. He's currently serving three life sentences in prison for the crimes uncovered at his House of Horrors abortion clinic. Ann McElhinney joins us with a look at the investigation that brought him to justice and how compliant politicians allowed him to carry out his grisly trade because they didn't want to "attack abortion."
  • Segment Guests:
    • Ann McElhinney
  • + Resources Mentioned Available in Our Store:

    • Gosnell: The Untold Story of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer

      Gosnell is the untold story of America's most prolific serial killer. In 2013 Dr Kermit Gosnell was convicted of killing four people, including three babies, but is thought to have killed hundreds, perhaps thousands more in a 30-year killing spree. ABC News correspondent Terry Moran described Gosnell as "America's most prolific serial killer." Gosnell is currently serving three life sentences (without the possibility of parole) for murdering babies and patients at his "House of Horrors" abortion clinic. This book—now a major movie starring Dean Cain (Lois & Clarke)—reveals how the investigation that brought Gosnell to justice started as a routine drugs investigation and turned into a shocking unmasking of America's biggest serial killer. It details how compliant politicians and bureaucrats allowed Dr. Gosnell to carry out his grisly trade because they didn’t want to be accused of “attacking abortion.” Gosnell also exposes the media coverup that saw reporters refusing to cover a story that shone an unwelcome spotlight on abortion in America in the 21st century. Gosnell is an astounding piece of investigative journalism revealing a coverup among the medical political and media establishments that allowed a killer to go undetected for decades. (learn more)

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