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Nominal Nation—The Shift Away From Self-Identified Christianity

Image processed by CodeCarvings Piczard ### FREE Community Edition ### on 2016-02-08 12:48:29Z | http://piczard.com | http://codecarvings.com
Image processed by CodeCarvings Piczard ### FREE Community Edition ### on 2016-02-08 12:48:29Z | http://piczard.com | http://codecarvings.com

There was a time in American history when it seemed like everyone was a Christian. Now, depending on where in America you live, it can seem like no one is a Christian. In reality, in our lifetimes, there was never a time when everyone was a Christian, and there will never be a time when there are no Christians.

We’ve used the term “Christian” so broadly that it sometimes doesn’t bear a resemblance to itself. It’s nearly become a word without a meaning in modern America. Or, I should say it has endless meanings. Therefore, we can get the wrong ideas about what is and is not true in the Church and in culture.

The way things were

At one point, there was more of a Judeo-Christian consensus. There was a time when most people in America lived by more religious principles. This is why America has been referred to as a “Christian nation.” Of course, we know that nations cannot be “born again” in an evangelical sense, so a nation can’t truly be “Christian.” Only individuals can be Christians.

Convictional Christians wielded disproportionate influence in the culture.
Now, 70-75% of American say they are Christians.

Read more at ChristianityToday.com…

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