Skip links

Malala: The World’s Response to Refugees Has Been Pitiful

Malala being guided by Muzoon Almellehan at the UNICEF school in Azraq refugee camp. Muzoon is a Syrian refugee living in Jordan. Malala is celebrating her 18th Birthday with Muzoon, a student and education activist in the Azraq refugee camp.
Malala being guided by Muzoon Almellehan at the UNICEF school in Azraq refugee camp. Muzoon is a Syrian refugee living in Jordan. Malala is celebrating her 18th Birthday with Muzoon, a student and education activist in the Azraq refugee camp.

After seeing the small body of Aylan Kurdi washed ashore in Turkey, I have prayed every day that his death will not be in vain. I have been asking myself: Is this the moment that our politicians will finally see that the children of Syria are the same as any other children? Will they finally acknowledge that people fleeing conflict have the right to be protected?

Syria’s refugees have committed no crime that justifies their suffering. They are doing what anyone would do if their home were no longer safe. I myself know what it is to have to leave your home, when my family was forced to leave our home in Swat Valley because of conflict and terrorism in 2009. We lived for three months as internally displaced people (IDPs). That is quite a short time compared to many refugees — but I know very well how hard it is to live like that, and how desperate is the desire of parents to find a safe place for their children to call home.

Read more at Time.com…

A great explanation of the refugee crisis:

Muslims Entering Europe Becoming Christians in Record Numbers

No, they aren’t cockroaches: How the Church can change the migrant debate

Why Some Arabs States Refuse to Accept Syrian Refugees

Share with Friends:

Leave a comment