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“Kresta in the Afternoon”—October 1, 2014

Talking about the “things that matter most” on October 1, 2014

 

4:00 – Kresta Comments: Adrian Peterson, Spanking and Media Hypocrisy.

The NFL is going through a Public Relations nightmare as more and more cases of domestic abuse by its players surface. One of the most prominent cases involves superstar Adrian Peterson, widely considered to be the best running back in the league. Peterson has been suspended for beating his four-year-old son with a switch and raising welts on the child’s arms and legs. Al comments on whether spanking is every permissible and criticizes the media’s coverage of the case.

 

4:20 –Kresta Comments: Why do People Think the Pope is Trying to Put Mary in the Trinity?

Non-Catholic Christians have repeatedly criticized the Church’s stance on Mary, frequently accusing Catholics of worshipping her. Recent comments by Pope Francis about the Blessed Mother have been misinterpreted and he is now being accused of decreeing Mary to be equal to or above Jesus. Al explains the Church’s actual teaching on the importance of Mary and discusses the idea of Mary as a co-redeemer.

 

4:40 – Standing Against the Human “Dignity Deniers”

Our Culture of Death says that a person’s value is determined by their contribution to society. This rationale is used to justify the killing of the unborn, the elderly and the infirm. Wesley Smith joins us with an answer to this argument.

 

5:00 – Arming Syrian Rebels: What Could Go Wrong

President Obama has made it clear that the United States will not send troops to fight ISIS. This week, Congress voted in favor of funding and training Syrian rebels to fight the terrorist group. Who are these rebels and what do they represent? Robert Spencer joins us to discuss the potential risks in arming to Syrian rebels.

 

5:20 – Appletopia

Apple is making headlines again with the release of the iPhone 6. Much of the multi-billion dollar company’s success can be attributed to its visionary founder, the late Steve Jobs. In his book Appletopia, media and culture critic Brett T. Robinson reconstructs Steve Jobs’ imagination for digital innovation in transcendent terms. From Zen Buddhism and Catholicism to dystopian and futurist thought, religion defined and branded Jobs’ design methodology. Robinson resurrects Jobs’ uncanny ability to integrate philosophical and religious thought with technological genius, laying the groundwork for Apple’s ubiquity today. As it turns out, culture was eager to find meaning in the burgeoning technological revolution, naming Jobs as its prophet and Apple’s advertising as its gospel. Brett joins us.

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