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Girls Turn Origami Into Water for the Thirsty

Origami crane folded from one uncut square of paper by Andreas Bauer Origami-Kuns
Origami crane folded from one uncut square of paper by Andreas Bauer Origami-Kuns

When Katherine Adams was four, her father taught her origami. She would fold paper with her dad in the hour after her sister’s school started, before the bus came for her. Eventually it became a family activity, as the older sister, Isabelle, also took up the hobby.

About a year later, what had started out as a dad-trick to help a little girl pass time turned into a globe-sized response to Jesus’ cry, “I thirst.”

Katherine and Isabelle, at ages five and eight, one day learned that children in some parts of the world don’t get the luxury of school, and for a simple reason: they don’t have water and have to walk for miles to get it.

The girls decided they had to do something to help their far-off peers, even if it would only be a little. They turned to their origami hobby as a possible solution.

Katherine and Isabelle approached the manager of a local coffee shop and asked if they could give away their origami ornaments there for a donation toward a well. The coffee shop manager said yes, and they made a goal of raising around $800, part of the total necessary to drill a single well in Ethiopia.

The girls brought their folded paper ornaments to the shop and sold out in two days. They got to work making more, and within two months they had raised more than $9,200 to build the first well.

Read more at Aleteia.org…

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