Please support Ave Maria Radio's online only drive!
show/hide

Ave Maria Radio's Online Only Membership Drive

Ave Maria Radio is conducting an online only membership drive this month aimed at raising much-needed funds and increasing its membership numbers. The goal is to get at least 250 new people to pledge their support and join a growing army of members who are making Ave Maria Radio a national powerhouse for the proclamation of the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church. By becoming a new member, you can be a part of this spirited movement of faith that broadcasts the salvation of Christ to people around the globe each and every day.

If everyone visiting this website made a tax-deductible donation right now – and there are hundreds of thousands of you – Ave Maria Radio would certainly meet its financial goals for the year in just 29 days! Think about it – the more you’re able to give, the nearer Ave Maria Radio gets to achieving its goals.

So do it now. Let’s put more people on the pathway to heaven. Become a new member today! Just click the donate button and make a difference! Stay tuned to this page to see our progress as the Ave Maria Radio online-only membership drive continues.

Please use the form below to contribute to Ave Maria Radio’s February Online Membership Drive.

NOTE: The form on this page is located on a secure site. If you wish to make a monthly recurring donation below, please insert only the monthly payment amount and not the total annual pledge amount into the Donation Amount field below. Also, please indicate if your pledge is for one year only in the Additional Information field. Your donations to Ave Maria Radio are fully tax deductible. You will receive an annual statement in January of each year for your donations.

If you have any problems with or questions about this form, or if you need to make a change to your existing recurring credit card donation, please contact Tony Gerring, Director of Advancement Services, at 734-930-4528 or email him at: [email protected].

 

 

The Public Discourse

We have the worst of both worlds: a Prohibitionary State that gives license to all kinds of evil, but that regulates and restricts actions that are not evil, to manage the chaos that results from the license.
 
In October, 1919, a heavily “progressive” Congress passed the Volstead Act enforcing the Eighteenth Amendment, prohibiting, for almost all purposes, the production, sale, and distribution of alcoholic beverages. There are two things everybody has learned from Prohibition. First, it is wrong to try to legislate morality. Second, you cannot do it, for Prohibition failed. But neither of these things is true, and the real lessons of Prohibition go unheeded.

First, law is nothing if not the codification of morality. All laws bear some relation, however distant, to a moral evaluation of good and bad. We cannot escape making moral distinctions. One man’s theft is another man’s redistribution of income. One man’s defense of family honor is another man’s murder. Even people who reduce law to utilitarian calculations cannot evade this truth. They may say, “It is useful to refrain from stealing, because then everyone’s goods will be secure,” appealing to self-interest. But why should security be prized higher than the thrill of danger? And how can mere usefulness bind my conscience? A man may fight to the death for justice, and to hell with utility.

Second, if Prohibition was intended to curtail hard drinking, it did work. It’s always easier to look at something that happened than to imagine what would have happened but didn’t. Most people obeyed the law. Of course there were speakeasies and bootleggers. The Kennedy family made their fortune on illegal whiskey. But there wasn’t a speakeasy on every street or a still in every backyard. Actuarial tables show that, shortly after Prohibition began, deaths from cirrhosis of the liver dropped considerably, and continued to drop through the twenties, leveling off by the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933.

After all, Prohibition did enjoy some wide support. Billy Sunday, baseball player and itinerant preacher, campaigned for it. Even Irish Catholics were not uniformly in opposition. I recall a photograph of a parade held in my coal-mining town in 1918, to celebrate the armistice. Prominent were the Knights of Father Mathew, an Irish temperance society.

So, then, what does Prohibition teach us?

Read the rest here: http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2013/10/7577/

Leave a Reply