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Congressional Hearing Reveals Planned Parenthood Likely Broke Laws to Sell Aborted Babies

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 8:  James Bopp, attorney for the Republican National Committee, speaks at the Supreme Court in Washington, on October 8, 2013 in Washington, DC. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Committee, a first amendment case that will determine how much money an individual can contribute directly to political campaigns. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 8: James Bopp, attorney for the Republican National Committee, speaks at the Supreme Court in Washington, on October 8, 2013 in Washington, DC. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Committee, a first amendment case that will determine how much money an individual can contribute directly to political campaigns. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

During a Congressional hearing today, a prominent pro-life attorney made it clear to members of Congress that Planned Parenthood likely broke multiple federal laws in its sale of aborted babies and their body parts for research.

James Bopp, the general counsel for the National Right to Life Committee, told the House Judiciary Committee that, “Recorded conversations, released by the Center for Medical Progress reveal many legal issues with Planned Parenthood’s procedures and practices regarding fetal tissue procurement.”

“These procedures and practices of Planned Parenthood, and their tissue procurement partners, show that federal laws when applicable, have been and are continuing to be violated during the procurement and sale of human fetal tissue,” Bopp explained.

As Bopp explained to the panel:

Federal law prohibits any person “to knowingly acquire, receive, or otherwise transfer any human fetal tissue for valuable consideration if the transfer affects interstate commerce.” Human fetal tissue includes all “tissue or cells obtained from a dead human embryo or fetus after a spontaneous or induced abortion, or after a stillbirth.”However, “valuable consideration does not include reasonable payments associated with the transportation, implantation, processing, preservation, quality control or storage of human fetal tissue.”

Read more at LifeNews.com…

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