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100 Questions that Jesus asked and YOU should answer

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Jesus asked a lot of questions. And rightly so, for he was a supreme teacher. And as any good teacher knows, simply supplying information is not enough. A good teacher wants to teach students to think and go probe more deeply not just the answers, but why they are true. A good teacher also wants the students to examine their own premises, and discover where they stand in relation to the truth. Yes, asking questions of students is a great way to make them think, and the word disciple means “learner” or “student.” Socrates used a similar strategy of asking questions and his method has come down to us today as the “Socratic Method.”

So Jesus, the supreme teaches asks a lot of questions. But note this, YOU are supposed to answer them! Don’t just read how Peter, James, John or Mary Magdalene answered them. When Jesus asks a question, stop, ponder it and answer it! It is a great way to pray the Scriptures and let Jesus be your teacher.

Indeed, one of the bigger mistakes people make in reading Scripture is that they read it as a spectator. For them Scripture is a collection of stories and events that took place thousands of years ago. True enough, we are reading historical accounts.

But, truth be told these ancient stories are our stories. We are in the narrative. You are Abraham, Sarah, Moses, Deborah, Jeremiah, Ruth, Peter, Paul, Magdalene, Mother Mary, and, if you are prepared to accept it, you are also Jesus. As the narrative we read unfolds, we are in the story. We cannot simply watch what others say or do or answer. For what Peter and Magdalene and others did, we do. Peter denied and ran. So do we. Magdalene loved and never gave up, should should we. Magdalene had a sinful past and a promising future, so do we. Peter was passionate and had a temper so do we. But Peter also loved the Lord and ultimately gave his life for the Lord. So can we. Jesus suffered and died but rose again and ascended to glory. So have we and so will we.

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