• YouTube
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Podcast
kresta-blog

Recent Posts

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 1

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Desire of the Everlasting Hills

    • Description: This film provides intimate and candid portraits of three Catholics trying to navigate the waters of self-understanding, faith, and homosexuality. It takes humility and courage to face certain questions about our lives. One such question is, “How do I know if I am designing my life well? By what standard can I come to a conclusion?” This question is closely linked with another, “What is the purpose of my life? What does it mean to be fulfilled and at peace?” And these are the central questions around which the film turns. One of the people featured in the film is Dan Mattson, a gregarious artist who spent his life hiding a deep sense of isolation from those who loved him. Dan joins us.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Desire of the Everlasting Hills (continued)

    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    The rise in Muslim converts to Christianity

    • Description: According to a thesis by Dr. Duane Miller, since the 1960’s there has been a marked increase in the number of known conversions from Islam to Christianity. He asks whether certain of these ex-Muslim Christians engage in the process of theology-making and, if so, it asks what these theologies claim to know about God and humans’ relation to God. Dr. Miller is here to discuss that question.
    • Segment Guests:
  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 2

    • Series Details: This program is part of a series titled kpm_20140825_2.mp3.

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Teachable Moments: Using Everyday Encounters with Media and Culture to Instill Conscience, Character and Faith.

    • Description: Never have Christian families been so challenged by the world around them to instill and instruct their children in the tenets of their faith. Moral relativism literally seeps into every facet of family life and saturates our popular culture. A ubiquitous media presence that defines our daily experience also is defining the attitudes and behaviors of those who consume it. Yet within this pervasive secular culture, Christian families encounter “teachable moments,” those unplanned but unmatched opportunities to put their faith into action and live out the values and virtues embodied in Jesus Christ. When looking for teachable moments, parents, and coaches must approach each day with intentionality, seeking out and capitalizing on opportunities to incorporate life lessons into every day experiences amid the culture. Author Marybeth Hicks joins us to discuss her latest book.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Marybeth Hicks
        Marybeth Hicks is a weekly columnist for The Washington Times and the founder and editor of OntheCulture.com, a blog for American women about the things that matter most. A frequent commentator on cultural issues, she has appeared on national television outlets including Fox News Channel’s Hannity, and Fox and Friends, the CBS Evening News, the Christian Broadcasting Network’s 700 Club, and on dozens of national and regional radio programs. She currently serves on the advisory board of the Parents Television Council, an organization seeking to promote decency on the airwaves.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Teachable Moments (continued)

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Teachable Moments (continued)

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014

    Talking about the “things that matter most” on August 25.

     

    4:00 – Desire of the Everlasting Hills

     

    This  film provides intimate and candid portraits of three Catholics trying to navigate the waters of self-understanding, faith, and homosexuality. It takes humility and courage to face certain questions about our lives.  One such question is, “How do I know if I am designing my life well?   By what standard can I come to a conclusion?”  This question is closely linked with another, “What is the purpose of my life?  What does it mean to be fulfilled and at peace?”  And these are the central questions around which the film turns. One of the people featured in the film is Dan Mattson, a gregarious artist who spent his life hiding a deep sense of isolation from those who loved him. Dan joins us. 

     

    4:40 – The rise in Muslim converts to Christianity

     

    According to a thesis by Dr. Duane Miller, since the 1960’s there has been a marked increase in the number of known conversions from Islam to Christianity. He asks whether certain of these ex-Muslim Christians engage in the process of theology-making and, if so, it asks what these theologies claim to know about God and humans’ relation to God. Dr. Miller is here to discuss that question.

      

     

    5:00 – Teachable Moments: Using Everyday Encounters with Media and Culture to Instill Conscience, Character and Faith.

     

    Never have Christian families been so challenged by the world around them to instill and instruct their children in the tenets of their faith. Moral relativism literally seeps into every facet of family life and saturates our popular culture. A ubiquitous media presence that defines our daily experience also is defining the attitudes and behaviors of those who consume it. Yet within this pervasive secular culture, Christian families encounter “teachable moments,” those unplanned but unmatched opportunities to put their faith into action and live out the values and virtues embodied in Jesus Christ. When looking for teachable moments, parents, and coaches must approach each day with intentionality, seeking out and capitalizing on opportunities to incorporate life lessons into every day experiences amid the culture. Author Marybeth Hicks joins us to discuss her latest book. 

  • An open letter to Richard Dawkins

    Last week, atheist Dr. Richard Dawkins commented on Twitter that it is immoral to not abort babies with Down Syndrome. JD Flynn, adoptive father of two Down Syndrome children, responds to Dr. Dawkins in this open letter.

    via First Things

    Dear Dr. Dawkins,

    Earlier this week, on Twitter, you drew attention to a troubling fact unknown to most people. You pointed out that in the United States and Europe, most children conceived with Down syndrome are aborted. You’re right. Some experts put the number as high as 90 percent. Others suggest that only 65 percent, or 70 percent, or 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are aborted. The actual number is probably very difficult to determine. You have a platform, Dr. Dawkins, an audience, and in some real way I’m very grateful that you drew attention to the pre-natal eradication of people with Down syndrome.

    But you made your point about the ubiquity of Down syndrome abortion in order to defend a terrible assertion. You suggested on Twitter, Dr. Dawkins, a moral imperative to abort children conceived with Down Syndrome. You said that if a woman had the choice to abort such a child, and she failed to so, she would have acted immorally. I’m troubled by that, and, very honestly, I’m confused.

    You’ve traditionally held a position of moral neutrality regarding abortion. You’ve asserted that killing animals, with the capacity to experience pain, fear, and suffering, is of greater moral significance than killing fetuses: nascently human, you assert, but without the kind of sentience that gives them moral significance. You’ve suggested that no carnivore can reasonably hold a position in opposition to abortion. You’re not alone in that position, it’s become de rigueur among most contemporary analytic ethicists.

    Idisagree with your position. I’ve long ago concluded that the fetus, the embryo, and in fact, the zygote are human beings—undeveloped, certainly, but possessing the dignity and the rights of sentient adults.

    Despite my disagreement, I recognize that you’ve tried to apply your viewpoint with consistency across a variety of ethical situations.

    Until this week. This week, you moved from presenting abortion as a morally neutral act to asserting that the abortion of some people—genetically disabled people—is a moral good. A moral imperative, in fact. You haven’t asserted a basis for this position. I suspect you believe that people with Down syndrome suffer, needlessly, and cause undue suffering to their friends and relatives. And, as a general principle, I believe you’re inclined to obviate as much human suffering as possible.

    You’ve often said that people who disagree with you should “go away, and learn how to think.” I’ve tried to learn to think, over the years, but perhaps I am naive in some ways. But one of things I’ve concluded is that ethical philosophy can’t be done in a sterile environment—that our humanity, our intuition, our empathy, in fact, must be recognized as a source of ethical insight if we want to think well. Perhaps you believe that your position on abortion and down syndrome is logically valid. But I wonder if you’re kept awake at night by the revulsion that comes with being the champion of killing.

    Suffering is not a moral evil to be avoided. Suffering can have meaning and value. Ask Victor Frankl. Or Mohandas Gandhi. Or Martin Luther King, Jr. Or, if you’re willing, ask my children.

    Ihave two children with Down syndrome. They’re adopted. Their birth-parents faced the choice to abort them, and didn’t. Instead the children came to live with us. They’re delightful children. They’re beautiful. They’re happy. One is a cancer survivor, twice-over. I found that in the hospital, as she underwent chemotherapy and we suffered through agony and exhaustion, our daughter Pia was more focused on befriending nurses and stealing stethoscopes. They suffer, my children, but in the context of irrepressible joy.

    I wonder, if you spent some time with them, whether you’d feel the same way about suffering, about happiness, about personal dignity. I wonder, if you danced with them in the kitchen, whether you’d think abortion was in their best interest. I wonder, if you played games with them, or shared a joke with them, whether you’d find some worth in their existence.

    And so, Dr. Dawkins, I’d like to invite you to dinner. Come spend time with my children. Share a meal with them. Before you advocate their deaths, come find out what’s worthwhile in their lives. Find out if the suffering is worth the joy.

    I don’t want you to come over for a debate. I don’t want to condemn you. I want you to experience the joy of children with Down syndrome. I want your heart to be moved to joy as well.

    Any day next week is good for us except for Wednesday.

    Sincerely yours,

    JD Flynn

  • Don’t be fooled by the latest HHS accommodations

    via Aleteia

    by Susan Wills

    Susan WillisIt’s déjà vu all over again. The Friday afternoon dump has become a fixture of the Washington scene in the past decade and so. That’s when the Administration chooses to release information about its latest controversial action to the media.

    It’s the optimal time for dumping information that’s likely to be unpopular with many Americans, because (1) hardly anyone pays attention to the news on the weekend and (2) by Monday, Friday afternoon’s “news” is stale and not likely to be covered.

    Last Friday’s dump was no exception.

    The Obama Administration released its eighth new and improved interim proposed version of the accommodation it is grudgingly willing to make for religious non-profits and certain closely held for-profits, which seek exemption from the mandated contraceptive coverage in Obamacare on religious liberty grounds.
    “Willing” only in the sense that it has lost now 3 times before the Supreme Court (the decision in Hobby Lobby and two orders, in Little Sisters of the Poor and Wheaton College) and has lost 90% of lower federal court decisions (whether for injunctions or on the merits).

    The bright side of being backed into a corner, from the Administration’s standpoint, is that with every new wrinkle in the regs, cases filed on the basis of earlier versions of the regulations may become moot, get dismissed and have to be refiled at further cost to the non-profit plaintiffs. This was the fate of suits brought by four Catholic dioceses, Franciscan U and Liberty U, and the American Family Association among others. And any delay favors the deep-pocket opponent—there being no party with pockets deeper than the collective (hapless) American taxpayer.

    For those of you tempted to click to a new article, anticipating that the discussion is about to go all wonky on you, please don’t. Because nothing so resembles the parade of Obamacare contraceptive mandate accommodation regs so much as “Groundhog Day.”

    The Becket Fund, which represents at least nine plaintiffs challenging the mandate, brought up the similarity in a post on Buzzfeed.

    In that great comedy classic, Bill Murray—an arrogant and jaded big-city reporter who chafed at being assigned to report on the groundhog’s annual weather forecast amidst all the hokeyness of Punxsatawney, PA—is fated to repeat that day until he gets everything right.

    We watch him being transformed from a selfish jerk into a true Christian, one who sees the goodness and beauty in others and who now lives solely to enrich their lives.

    That’s where the resemblance ends, of course.

    The Administration has been inching away from its original position–that only houses of worship would be exempt from obama hhsthe mandate–to its present one, but there’s no realistic hope that this Administration will ever adopt a Christian point of view in defense of religious liberty, especially when it involves “reproductive healthcare.”

    Below is a précis of the Becket Fund’s Groundhog Day version of the religious exception and accommodation regs.

    1. August 1, 2011:  The mandate is announced. To “avoid” its burdening religion, HHS announces a very narrow exception for some houses of worship, but  excludes those that serve people of other faiths and that do almost anything beyond the inculcation of faith..
    2. February 10, 2012:  A “Temporary Enforcement Safe Harbor”—exempting religious non-profits for at least 18 months—is announced because the concerns of scores of such non-profits cannot all be resolved prior to implementation.

    3. March 21, 2012:  Acknowledging that its original exemption was too narrow, HHS now proposes an “accommodation” for religious non-profits.

    4. August 15, 2012:  Even the “Safe Harbor” is too narrow and the Administration admits that, in responding to a lawsuit by Wheaton College. It decides to broaden the Safe Harbor to include organizations like Wheaton College.

    Read More

  • Kresta in the Afternoon – August 25, 2014 – Hour 2

    Kresta in the Afternoon – August 25, 2014 – Hour 2

    • Description: Kresta in the Afternoon is what Catholic radio has been missing: a daily conversation - personal, authentic and human. It looks at all of life through the lens of Scripture and the teaching tradition of the Catholic Church. The scope is not limited to spiritual subjects...our host Al Kresta talks abortion, war, peace, dissent, old age, New Age, heavy metal, light eating, politics, church affairs, current events, family and marriage, movies and media, theology and apologetics, sports, crime and business. It's talk radio where God matters.
  • Kresta in the Afternoon – August 22, 2014 – Hour 1

    Kresta in the Afternoon – August 22, 2014 – Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Kresta Comments - Race in America

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Kresta Comments - Race in America

    + Segment #3 of 3

    The LCWR Doubles Down on Dissent

    • Description: For the third year in a row, the question of how the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) would respond to a Vatican mandate to reform the organization spiked high interest in the group’s annual assembly Aug. 12-15.And for the third year in a row, the assembly ended not with a bang, but a whimper. Some fireworks did ignite as the main speakers spent most of their energy defending positions taken by the LCWR, even openly criticizing the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), which had ordered the reform in April of 2012 after a three-year doctrinal assessment. Executive sessions that excluded non-members of LCWR also reportedly focused on the mandate. In the end, however, the LCWR National Board issued a two-paragraph statement similar to those of 2012 and 2013: LCWR would stay in the “conversation” with the CDF delegate, Archbishop J. Peter Sartain of Seattle, as long as LCWR’s “mission” and “integrity” were not compromised. We talk to Ann Carey, author of Sisters in Crisis.
    • Segment Guests:
  • Kresta in the Afternoon – August 22, 2014 – Hour 2

    Kresta in the Afternoon – August 22, 2014 – Hour 2

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Satanists Return Stolen Host to Archbishop Coakley / JP2MRI Benefitting From "Ice Bucket Challenge" Catholic Twist

    • Description: Oklahoma City's archbishop voiced relief that Satanists organizing a "black mass" in the city returned a stolen host that was to be desecrated, but restated his concern that the event should happen at all. The host was given to a priest yesterday by an attorney representing Adam Daniels, who organized the black mass. We talk to Joan Frawley Desmond of the National Catholic Register who has been covering the story extensively. AND The "Ice Bucket Challenge" to cure ALS has taken a Catholic turn when people realized that the ALS Association does embryonic stem cell research. Dr. Alan Moye of the JP2 Medical Research Institute
    • Segment Guests:
      • Joan Frawley Desmond
        National Catholic Register’s senior editor. She is an award-winning journalist widely published in Catholic, ecumenical and secular media. A graduate of the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies of Marriage and Family, she lives with her family in Menlo Park, Ca, in the San Francisco Archdiocese.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Are You Called to Be a Spiritual Director?

    + Segment #3 of 3

    When the Game Stands Tall

  • Today on “Kresta in the Afternoon” – Aug. 22

    Talking about the “things that matter most” on August 22

    4:00 – Kresta Comments

    4:40 – The LCWR Doubles Down on Dissent
    For the third year in a row, the question of how the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) would respond to a Vatican mandate to reform the organization spiked high interest in the group’s annual assembly Aug. 12-15.And for the third year in a row, the assembly ended not with a bang, but a whimper. Some fireworks did ignite as the main speakers spent most of their energy defending positions taken by the LCWR, even openly criticizing the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), which had ordered the reform in April of 2012 after a three-year doctrinal assessment. Executive sessions that excluded non-members of LCWR also reportedly focused on the mandate. In the end, however, the LCWR National Board issued a two-paragraph statement similar to those of 2012 and 2013: LCWR would stay in the “conversation” with the CDF delegate, Archbishop J. Peter Sartain of Seattle, as long as LCWR’s “mission” and “integrity” were not compromised. We talk to Ann Carey, author of Sisters in Crisis.

    5:00 – Satanists Return Stolen Host to Archbishop Coakley
    Oklahoma City’s archbishop voiced relief that Satanists organizing a “black mass” in the city returned a stolen host that was to be desecrated, but restated his concern that the event should happen at all. The host was given to a priest yesterday by an attorney representing Adam Daniels, who organized the black mass. We talk to Joan Frawley Desmond of the National Catholic Register who has been covering the story extensively.

    5:20 – Are You Called to Be a Spiritual Director?
    People around the world are starving to know the God who loves them and who made them for an eternal relationship with Him. But who will lead them? Who has the time, the training, and the desire to help souls who thirst and hunger for God? Well, maybe YOU do. Those familiar with the history of Spiritual Direction know that Spiritual Direction began among the laity in the early church and has never been the sole domain of priests. In fact, St. John Paul II was deeply influenced to the heights of sanctity through his lay Spiritual Director, Servant of God Jan Tyranowski. We talk to Dan Burke about laity and spiritual direction. We also talk about today’s memorial of the Queenship of Mary.

    5:40 – When the Game Stands Tall
    When the Game Stands Tall tells the journey of legendary football coach Bob Ladouceur, who took the De La Salle High School Spartans from obscurity to a 151-game winning streak that shattered all records for any American sport. But it also tells the story of boys becoming men – men of faith, brotherhood, and integrity. We talk to the real-life Coach Bob Ladouceur and his assistant coach Terry Eidson.

  • Satanist agrees to hand over Host

    via Aleteia

    by John Burger

    john burgerA day after the Archbishop of Oklahoma City sued him, the leader of a satanic group that plans to stage a public “black mass” one month from today agreed to hand over what he claims is a consecrated Host.

    “Facing a potential court order, Adams Daniels, leader of a Satanist group which had announced plans to hold a Black Mass next month in Oklahoma City, today agreed to return an illicitly obtained Consecrated Host to Archbishop Paul Coakley, head of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City,” said a press release from Busch & Caspino, the Orange County, Calif.-based firm that filed the lawsuit yesterday in Oklahoma City District Court on behalf of Archbishop Coakley

    The Church has exercised “dominion and control” over all Consecrated Hosts for 2,000 years, said attorney Michael Caspino, CEO of Busch and Caspino. And Daniels and his organization, the Dakhma of Angra Mainyu, had obtained one under fraudulent circumstances, Caspino said.

    Yesterday, after the lawsuit was filed, Daniels told Aleteia that a Catholic priest living in another country is a member of the Dakhma of Angra Mainyu and consecrated a host for the purpose of using it in the black mass, planned for the Oklahoma City Civic Center.

    “Today, Daniels agreed to return this sacred property. We stared down the devil and he blinked,” Caspino said. “We had no doubt the Court would respect our argument – rooted in both Canon and civil law – which maintains that all Consecrated Hosts belong to the Church. This is a tremendous victory for decency and respect for all religions. Any time anyone tries to desecrate this blessed property, we will be there to stop them.”

    “A key part of the Black Mass is to desecrate or destroy a Consecrated Host,” Caspino said. “Without this sacred property, a Black Mass has absolutely no significance, so this group will not be able to hold its satanic ritual as planned.”

YouTube Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Podcast