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Another Victory for the Little Sisters of the Poor

By Kathy Schiffer

The Little Sisters of the Poor enjoyed another victory in the court on Friday, January 24.  The Supreme Court, in a unanimous ruling, extended the temporary order imposed by Justice Sonia Sotomayor on December 31.  The ruling bars the Obama administration from forcing the Sisters to comply with the contraception coverage requirement of the Affordable Care Act while their case is pending in a federal appeals court.

The injunction means that the religious order will not be forced to sign and deliver the controversial government forms authorizing and instructing their benefits administrator to provide contraceptives.  

Mark L. Rienzi of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, who has represented the nuns in their fight against the contraceptive mandate, noted that the ruling also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organizations which receive health benefits through the Christian Brothers Employee Benefit Trust.

The Supreme Court justices emphasized that their order should not be construed as an expression of their views on the merits of the case.  And the Court, while ruling that the Little Sisters need not sign a government form that also authorizes their health plan administrator to “process claims for contraceptive coverage,” stipulated that the Little Sisters must “inform the Secretary of Health and Human Services in writing that they are nonprofit organizations that hold themselves out as religious and have religious objections to providing coverage for contraceptive services.”

The ruling is viewed as a setback for the Obama administration's sweeping health care reform law.  U.S. Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr., in a brief filed January 3, had asked the Supreme Court not to grant the injunction.  The Little Sisters of the Poor, Verrilli charged in the Justice Department brief, "fail to satisfy the demanding standard for the extraordinary and rarely granted relief they seek:  an original injunction from this court."

The Supreme Court has two other cases on its agenda which will potentially impact the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  Those cases involve two for-profit companies:  Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties.  In those cases, the Justice Department has claimed that "a secular company does not engage in any exercise of religion" and "may not impose its owners' personal religious beliefs on its employees." 

The Justice Department continues to insist that the secular employers cannot impose their religious beliefs on their employees, and claims that a Supreme Court ruling in favor of the companies would "cripple the government's ability to solve national problems through laws of general application" such as the Affordable Care Act.




Another Victory for the Little Sisters of the Poor

By Kathy Schiffer

The Little Sisters of the Poor enjoyed another victory in the court on Friday, January 24.  The Supreme Court, in a unanimous ruling, extended the temporary order imposed by Justice Sonia Sotomayor on December 31.  The ruling bars the Obama administration from forcing the Sisters to comply with the contraception coverage requirement of the Affordable Care Act while their case is pending in a federal appeals court.

The injunction means that the religious order will not be forced to sign and deliver the controversial government forms authorizing and instructing their benefits administrator to provide contraceptives.  

Mark L. Rienzi of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, who has represented the nuns in their fight against the contraceptive mandate, noted that the ruling also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organizations which receive health benefits through the Christian Brothers Employee Benefit Trust.

The Supreme Court justices emphasized that their order should not be construed as an expression of their views on the merits of the case.  And the Court, while ruling that the Little Sisters need not sign a government form that also authorizes their health plan administrator to “process claims for contraceptive coverage,” stipulated that the Little Sisters must “inform the Secretary of Health and Human Services in writing that they are nonprofit organizations that hold themselves out as religious and have religious objections to providing coverage for contraceptive services.”

The ruling is viewed as a setback for the Obama administration's sweeping health care reform law.  U.S. Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr., in a brief filed January 3, had asked the Supreme Court not to grant the injunction.  The Little Sisters of the Poor, Verrilli charged in the Justice Department brief, "fail to satisfy the demanding standard for the extraordinary and rarely granted relief they seek:  an original injunction from this court."

The Supreme Court has two other cases on its agenda which will potentially impact the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  Those cases involve two for-profit companies:  Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties.  In those cases, the Justice Department has claimed that "a secular company does not engage in any exercise of religion" and "may not impose its owners' personal religious beliefs on its employees." 

The Justice Department continues to insist that the secular employers cannot impose their religious beliefs on their employees, and claims that a Supreme Court ruling in favor of the companies would "cripple the government's ability to solve national problems through laws of general application" such as the Affordable Care Act.




Another Victory for the Little Sisters of the Poor

By Kathy Schiffer

The Little Sisters of the Poor enjoyed another victory in the court on Friday, January 24.  The Supreme Court, in a unanimous ruling, extended the temporary order imposed by Justice Sonia Sotomayor on December 31.  The ruling bars the Obama administration from forcing the Sisters to comply with the contraception coverage requirement of the Affordable Care Act while their case is pending in a federal appeals court.

The injunction means that the religious order will not be forced to sign and deliver the controversial government forms authorizing and instructing their benefits administrator to provide contraceptives.  

Mark L. Rienzi of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, who has represented the nuns in their fight against the contraceptive mandate, noted that the ruling also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organizations which receive health benefits through the Christian Brothers Employee Benefit Trust.

The Supreme Court justices emphasized that their order should not be construed as an expression of their views on the merits of the case.  And the Court, while ruling that the Little Sisters need not sign a government form that also authorizes their health plan administrator to “process claims for contraceptive coverage,” stipulated that the Little Sisters must “inform the Secretary of Health and Human Services in writing that they are nonprofit organizations that hold themselves out as religious and have religious objections to providing coverage for contraceptive services.”

The ruling is viewed as a setback for the Obama administration's sweeping health care reform law.  U.S. Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr., in a brief filed January 3, had asked the Supreme Court not to grant the injunction.  The Little Sisters of the Poor, Verrilli charged in the Justice Department brief, "fail to satisfy the demanding standard for the extraordinary and rarely granted relief they seek:  an original injunction from this court."

The Supreme Court has two other cases on its agenda which will potentially impact the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  Those cases involve two for-profit companies:  Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties.  In those cases, the Justice Department has claimed that "a secular company does not engage in any exercise of religion" and "may not impose its owners' personal religious beliefs on its employees." 

The Justice Department continues to insist that the secular employers cannot impose their religious beliefs on their employees, and claims that a Supreme Court ruling in favor of the companies would "cripple the government's ability to solve national problems through laws of general application" such as the Affordable Care Act.




Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 24, 2014

Talking about the "things that matter most" on January 24

4:00 – Review: “Gimme Shelter”

4:20 – Birmingham Revolution: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Epic Challenge to the Church
From time to time prophetic Christian voices rise to challenge our nation’s "original sin." In the twentieth century, compelled by the Spirit of God and a yearning for freedom, the African American church took the lead in heralding the effort. Like almost no other movement before or since, Christian people gave force to a social mission. And, remarkably, they did it largely through nonviolent actions. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s words and historic efforts as the Moses of this civil rights movement stand out as perhaps the most significant instance of a modern Christian leader acting in a prophetic role to instigate political change. In many ways "The Letter from Birmingham Jail" stands at the center of that movement. In this book African American journalist Edward Gilbreath explores the place of that letter in the life and work of Dr. King. Birmingham Revolutionis not simply a work of historical reflection. Gilbreath encourages us to reflect on the relevance of King's work for the church and culture of our day. Whether it’s in debates about immigration, economic redistribution or presidential birth certificates, race continues to play a role in shaping society. What part will the church play in the ongoing struggle? Edward joins us.

5:00 – Race With the Devil: My Journey from Racial Hatred to Rational Love

Before he was the world’s foremost Catholic biographer, Joseph Pearce was a leader of the National Front, a British-nationalist, white-supremacist group. Before he published books highlighting and celebrating the great Catholic cultural tradition, he disseminated literature extolling the virtues of the white race, and calling for the banishment of all non-white from Britain. Pearce and his cohorts were at the center of the racial and nationalist tensions—often violent—that swirled around London in the late-1970s and early 80s. A one-year prison term spurred a sea change in his life. He is here to talk about it.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 24, 2014

Talking about the "things that matter most" on January 24

4:00 – Review: “Gimme Shelter”

4:20 – Birmingham Revolution: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Epic Challenge to the Church
From time to time prophetic Christian voices rise to challenge our nation’s "original sin." In the twentieth century, compelled by the Spirit of God and a yearning for freedom, the African American church took the lead in heralding the effort. Like almost no other movement before or since, Christian people gave force to a social mission. And, remarkably, they did it largely through nonviolent actions. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s words and historic efforts as the Moses of this civil rights movement stand out as perhaps the most significant instance of a modern Christian leader acting in a prophetic role to instigate political change. In many ways "The Letter from Birmingham Jail" stands at the center of that movement. In this book African American journalist Edward Gilbreath explores the place of that letter in the life and work of Dr. King. Birmingham Revolutionis not simply a work of historical reflection. Gilbreath encourages us to reflect on the relevance of King's work for the church and culture of our day. Whether it’s in debates about immigration, economic redistribution or presidential birth certificates, race continues to play a role in shaping society. What part will the church play in the ongoing struggle? Edward joins us.

5:00 – Race With the Devil: My Journey from Racial Hatred to Rational Love

Before he was the world’s foremost Catholic biographer, Joseph Pearce was a leader of the National Front, a British-nationalist, white-supremacist group. Before he published books highlighting and celebrating the great Catholic cultural tradition, he disseminated literature extolling the virtues of the white race, and calling for the banishment of all non-white from Britain. Pearce and his cohorts were at the center of the racial and nationalist tensions—often violent—that swirled around London in the late-1970s and early 80s. A one-year prison term spurred a sea change in his life. He is here to talk about it.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 24, 2014

Talking about the "things that matter most" on January 24

4:00 – Review: “Gimme Shelter”

4:20 – Birmingham Revolution: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Epic Challenge to the Church
From time to time prophetic Christian voices rise to challenge our nation’s "original sin." In the twentieth century, compelled by the Spirit of God and a yearning for freedom, the African American church took the lead in heralding the effort. Like almost no other movement before or since, Christian people gave force to a social mission. And, remarkably, they did it largely through nonviolent actions. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s words and historic efforts as the Moses of this civil rights movement stand out as perhaps the most significant instance of a modern Christian leader acting in a prophetic role to instigate political change. In many ways "The Letter from Birmingham Jail" stands at the center of that movement. In this book African American journalist Edward Gilbreath explores the place of that letter in the life and work of Dr. King. Birmingham Revolutionis not simply a work of historical reflection. Gilbreath encourages us to reflect on the relevance of King's work for the church and culture of our day. Whether it’s in debates about immigration, economic redistribution or presidential birth certificates, race continues to play a role in shaping society. What part will the church play in the ongoing struggle? Edward joins us.

5:00 – Race With the Devil: My Journey from Racial Hatred to Rational Love

Before he was the world’s foremost Catholic biographer, Joseph Pearce was a leader of the National Front, a British-nationalist, white-supremacist group. Before he published books highlighting and celebrating the great Catholic cultural tradition, he disseminated literature extolling the virtues of the white race, and calling for the banishment of all non-white from Britain. Pearce and his cohorts were at the center of the racial and nationalist tensions—often violent—that swirled around London in the late-1970s and early 80s. A one-year prison term spurred a sea change in his life. He is here to talk about it.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 23

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on January 23

4:00 – Kresta Comments

4:20 – Illiberal Catholicism
What do nostalgic, Renaissance Faire Catholics have in common with neo-Marxists? What do would-be Catholic “Amish” separatists share with Inquisition re-enactors? What is the thread linking Cardinal Dolan, who wished that he could be the “biggest cheerleader” for Obamacare, and the right-wing Catholics who downplayed the bishops’ plea for religious liberty in the face of the HHS mandate — arguing that, instead, Catholics ought to be arguing whether contraception should even be legal? John Zmirak is here to answer those questions.

5:00 – Has the Media Finally Turned a Corner on Coverage of the March for Life?
ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, C-SPAN, FOX NEWS, CNN, The New York Times, USA Today, the Washington Post, Reuters, the Associated Press, UPI, and more. What do they all have in common? Well – a lot – but yesterday there was one thing in particular: They all covered the March for Life and actually interviewed presenters, organizers, and marchers. Teresa Tomeo was there reporting for EWTN’s Live Coverage and tells us whether she thinks the media has turned a corner on one of the biggest annual Washington event.

5:20 – Police: Justin Bieber was drinking alcohol, smoking marijuana, and taking prescription medication when arrested for drag racing
Police said today that pop singer Justin Beiber was arrested last night for drag-racing down a Miami Beach street while under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs. He was charged with DUI, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Beiber is 19 years old. We use this as an opportunity to look at celebrity drug deaths, why they seem common and what lessons we can learn. Mike Vasquez of the St. Gregory Center for Drug and Alcohol Rehab joins us.

5:40 – Lone Survivor: The Man Behind the Movie

Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history. Marcus joins us.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 23

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on January 23

4:00 – Kresta Comments

4:20 – Illiberal Catholicism
What do nostalgic, Renaissance Faire Catholics have in common with neo-Marxists? What do would-be Catholic “Amish” separatists share with Inquisition re-enactors? What is the thread linking Cardinal Dolan, who wished that he could be the “biggest cheerleader” for Obamacare, and the right-wing Catholics who downplayed the bishops’ plea for religious liberty in the face of the HHS mandate — arguing that, instead, Catholics ought to be arguing whether contraception should even be legal? John Zmirak is here to answer those questions.

5:00 – Has the Media Finally Turned a Corner on Coverage of the March for Life?
ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, C-SPAN, FOX NEWS, CNN, The New York Times, USA Today, the Washington Post, Reuters, the Associated Press, UPI, and more. What do they all have in common? Well – a lot – but yesterday there was one thing in particular: They all covered the March for Life and actually interviewed presenters, organizers, and marchers. Teresa Tomeo was there reporting for EWTN’s Live Coverage and tells us whether she thinks the media has turned a corner on one of the biggest annual Washington event.

5:20 – Police: Justin Bieber was drinking alcohol, smoking marijuana, and taking prescription medication when arrested for drag racing
Police said today that pop singer Justin Beiber was arrested last night for drag-racing down a Miami Beach street while under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs. He was charged with DUI, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Beiber is 19 years old. We use this as an opportunity to look at celebrity drug deaths, why they seem common and what lessons we can learn. Mike Vasquez of the St. Gregory Center for Drug and Alcohol Rehab joins us.

5:40 – Lone Survivor: The Man Behind the Movie

Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history. Marcus joins us.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 23

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on January 23

4:00 – Kresta Comments

4:20 – Illiberal Catholicism
What do nostalgic, Renaissance Faire Catholics have in common with neo-Marxists? What do would-be Catholic “Amish” separatists share with Inquisition re-enactors? What is the thread linking Cardinal Dolan, who wished that he could be the “biggest cheerleader” for Obamacare, and the right-wing Catholics who downplayed the bishops’ plea for religious liberty in the face of the HHS mandate — arguing that, instead, Catholics ought to be arguing whether contraception should even be legal? John Zmirak is here to answer those questions.

5:00 – Has the Media Finally Turned a Corner on Coverage of the March for Life?
ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, C-SPAN, FOX NEWS, CNN, The New York Times, USA Today, the Washington Post, Reuters, the Associated Press, UPI, and more. What do they all have in common? Well – a lot – but yesterday there was one thing in particular: They all covered the March for Life and actually interviewed presenters, organizers, and marchers. Teresa Tomeo was there reporting for EWTN’s Live Coverage and tells us whether she thinks the media has turned a corner on one of the biggest annual Washington event.

5:20 – Police: Justin Bieber was drinking alcohol, smoking marijuana, and taking prescription medication when arrested for drag racing
Police said today that pop singer Justin Beiber was arrested last night for drag-racing down a Miami Beach street while under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs. He was charged with DUI, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Beiber is 19 years old. We use this as an opportunity to look at celebrity drug deaths, why they seem common and what lessons we can learn. Mike Vasquez of the St. Gregory Center for Drug and Alcohol Rehab joins us.

5:40 – Lone Survivor: The Man Behind the Movie

Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history. Marcus joins us.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – January 23

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on January 23

4:00 – Kresta Comments

4:20 – Illiberal Catholicism
What do nostalgic, Renaissance Faire Catholics have in common with neo-Marxists? What do would-be Catholic “Amish” separatists share with Inquisition re-enactors? What is the thread linking Cardinal Dolan, who wished that he could be the “biggest cheerleader” for Obamacare, and the right-wing Catholics who downplayed the bishops’ plea for religious liberty in the face of the HHS mandate — arguing that, instead, Catholics ought to be arguing whether contraception should even be legal? John Zmirak is here to answer those questions.

5:00 – Has the Media Finally Turned a Corner on Coverage of the March for Life?
ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, C-SPAN, FOX NEWS, CNN, The New York Times, USA Today, the Washington Post, Reuters, the Associated Press, UPI, and more. What do they all have in common? Well – a lot – but yesterday there was one thing in particular: They all covered the March for Life and actually interviewed presenters, organizers, and marchers. Teresa Tomeo was there reporting for EWTN’s Live Coverage and tells us whether she thinks the media has turned a corner on one of the biggest annual Washington event.

5:20 – Police: Justin Bieber was drinking alcohol, smoking marijuana, and taking prescription medication when arrested for drag racing
Police said today that pop singer Justin Beiber was arrested last night for drag-racing down a Miami Beach street while under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs. He was charged with DUI, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Beiber is 19 years old. We use this as an opportunity to look at celebrity drug deaths, why they seem common and what lessons we can learn. Mike Vasquez of the St. Gregory Center for Drug and Alcohol Rehab joins us.

5:40 – Lone Survivor: The Man Behind the Movie

Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history. Marcus joins us.
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